Author Topic: Were the 16 episodes of Cho Kuse Ni Narisou ripped from DVD?  (Read 2690 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline kwfine

  • n00b Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Were the 16 episodes of Cho Kuse Ni Narisou ripped from DVD?
« on: February 19, 2007, 03:57:48 pm »
Hi, I have just seen the first episode of Cho Kuse Ni Narisou, but find something strange with the video.
The pictures and the subtitles are really not clear enough.
I wonder if the 16 videos were ripped directly from DVDs?

Offline Galen

  • n00b Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 35
    • View Profile
Re: Were the 16 episodes of Cho Kuse Ni Narisou ripped from DVD?
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2007, 04:46:35 pm »
There has never been a DVD release. AFAIK, the  VHS release is the only source available. (And rather tempting, at only $200.)

-Galen

Offline kwfine

  • n00b Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: Were the 16 episodes of Cho Kuse Ni Narisou ripped from DVD?
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2007, 10:31:16 pm »
There has never been a DVD release. AFAIK, the  VHS release is the only source available. (And rather tempting, at only $200.)

-Galen

Many thanks, Galen!
So, how were the 16 episodes ripped into AVI?
Is there a software for ripping VHS?

Offline Galen

  • n00b Hero
  • *
  • Posts: 35
    • View Profile
Re: Were the 16 episodes of Cho Kuse Ni Narisou ripped from DVD?
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2007, 02:29:11 am »
Digitizing VHS is done with hardware, actually, using a class of devices called "video capture equipment". (Lots of places sell devices for converting home videos to DVD, but commercial tapes have protection to prevent such copying with home equipment.) It's been many years since I last needed to convert a VHS tape to DVD, so I've forgotten exactly how it used to be done.
-Galen

Offline Sindobook

  • Maetel Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 661
    • View Profile
Re: Were the 16 episodes of Cho Kuse Ni Narisou ripped from DVD?
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2007, 04:54:15 am »
VirtualDub was originally designed for video capture.  B'cos most of the applications that came with the hardware didn't work at all or work well.  Bad a/v sync and dropped frames are two of the main problems and fixes are not always possible.  Some commercial tapes have macrovision protection but this is easy to defeat, either with a video stabilizer or manually setting the color correction parameters.  The best way is to capture completely uncompressed and then noise filter while the video is still uncompressed.  Fortunately today things are much easier, you can just use a DVD recorder and then rip the DVD as necessary.  Not as good as capturing it with a specialized device uncompressed, but it does a good enough job without any of the headaches people had to deal with in the past.